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Historical Leadership


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#1 George Guzzardo

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 11:51 AM

Just got back from Columbus and wanted to dig into the forums to find all my friends who want to create a thread about historical leadership. If you have learned a lesson from your reading history or have a favorite person in history let's expand our knowledge of the past so we can be better prepared for the future.


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#2 George Guzzardo

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 07:21 PM

Have you learned any lessons when there were declines in society from the lack of leadership?

What periods do you remember when leaders changed the decline into a period of growth, restoration, or revival?


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#3 John Feldhouse

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 12:23 PM

I was trying to think of an unknown story people might not have heard before. As I was thinking about who I could share, I decided to use a direct influence in my life being trained as a graphic designer. This is a brief history of David Carson.

 

David Carson, a now famous graphic designer worldwide, didn't originally start out as a graphic designer. He went to school for Sociology. In fact, he was a professional surfer and was ranked the 9th best surfer in the world in 1989. In 1983 he was introduced to graphic design, fell in love with it, so he immersed himself into the art. He studied design in Switzerland in a 3-week workshop to get a degree. He found a mentor in Hans-Rudolf Lutz. 

 

He became an art director for a skateboarding & snowboarding magazine for 4 years from 1984-1988. This was the most influential time in his career as he set the foundation for what he would later become famous for. He didn't have much of a formal education in design but he had an innate sense of what to do and to break the rules. 

 

In 1992 he went onto Ray Gun magazine, where he achieved massive success and notoriety. In one issue, he notoriously used Dingbat, a font containing only symbols, as the font for what he considered a rather dull interview with Bryan Ferry. Carson created what is known as the "grunge" style used today (and heavily used within the LIFE Leadership business). He broke all the rules: he didn't use grids, he was unapologetically going to throw anything at the magazine to convey his message. He destroyed the "sacred" typefaces, he cut images off on purpose, he overlayed images on top of one another to visually enhance his message, etc. He was truly a rascal and many traditionalists inside the design community thought what he was doing was blasphemy. 

 

He has gone on to author books, speak all over the world and lead other designers to follow their passionate pursuit. In short, David Carson has inspired many but it took a period of being uncomfortable and doing what he felt was ultimately the best. 

 

Clearly, you can see parallels to his story and the LIFE Leadership business. It seems to be a reoccurring theme in history that those who achieve greatness are met with strong opposition, don't necessarily have the ideal training but have the desire to be a champion. David Carson still inspires some of my work today, however, his story is more of the inspiration in my life.

 

What will you achieve today?


"Be curious, not judgmental."
              – Walt Whitman

 


#4 George Guzzardo

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 04:04 PM

John, That is awesome. I love uncovering various historical leaders. I wonder where this will lead us as we uncover these amazing people who have impacted us in various ways?



#5 RDDuxbury

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 06:52 PM

Before I knew nothing about freedom. Now after reading lots of books from the Life Leadership I have come to respect John Locke. Lots of his writings changed the world. Further more I am shocked on how so few people know of him. I can't wait to learn more about freedom.

Rob

#6 George Guzzardo

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 08:31 PM

Rob, That was an amazing period in time. There were many forces that effected a declining society similar to today. Maybe that is why there were so many who stood up for the principles of freedom. Algernon Sydney was another worth checking into. Look into Cromwell, John Owen, and Milton. Thanks for your interest. George


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#7 Evan G

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 10:06 PM

I am not sure if he is my favorite, but he is a favorite, and that is John Adams. I read the biography on him and watched the miniseries about him. I think he was a very important part of the founding of America. He spoke up when needing and had no reservations about it, sometimes to a fault. He sacrificed many years away from his family. He missed his children growing up. I feel he should be more talked about. I know George Washington and Benjamin Franklin did a lot of things, but I think John Adams should be given a bit more recognition.

Being a Canadian though, I should find some amazing Canadians in history and talk about them.

#8 George Guzzardo

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 11:11 PM

Hey Evan, Im always impressed about how many Canadians are knowledgable about the American's history. I feel like we haven't been as good as students as we could be about the Canadians. That was until I learned about Giovanni Caboto. He was the Italian explorer who discovered Canada. I think he is a real cool guy. What do you know about John Cabot?



#9 Evan G

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 07:01 AM

I probably should know from grade eight history class. But honestly I dont know too much. I've heard the name though.

I know of other explorers who discovered other parts of Canada such Jacques Cartier and Samuel de Champlain. But Cabots achievements I'm not too sure on.

#10 sgtmom1-Angel

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 01:25 AM

I know I am working on the Ten year reading plan with the Great Books of the Western World (aka. the Great Conversation)-54 Volumes set put out by Britanica. I have just begun, but am excited to read and learn from Plato, and many others through out history. I would also suggest getting the basics in the 5000 Year Leap and the Making of America by Cleon Skousen-if you can get the guided study program that is the way to go. Another great book might The Education of James Madison: A model for Today by Swanson. My husband being in the military has read many different Leadership books and has quite a few he has enjoyed and has in our library.


http://freedomlifeli...e.blogspot.com/

Listening to many, many Audios and Reading from several books at once, absorbing and integrating the information, Transforming myself into the woman I need to be to fulfill my mission and purpose which Heavenly Father put me me on earth to do.  


#11 John Feldhouse

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 10:07 AM

George, one of the first books I read that really got me excited about history was Sophie's World. It's a brief history of philosophers over time put together with a little story of a girl and mentor. 

 

If you have any interest in philosophers in history, it will cover a brief overview of the greats. I highly recommend the book. 


"Be curious, not judgmental."
              – Walt Whitman

 


#12 rnpalacios

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 09:55 PM

I love John Ratzinger's (Pope Emeritus Benedict) story. From his first inkling to become a priest and dedicate his life to Christ to his resignation as Pope, he had the faithful in mind through most of his life. The more I learn about him, the more enthusiastic a supporter I become. His ferocity to protect the church is seen in his work under Pope John Paul II, as the Defender of the Faith. He was a brilliant student and theologian. And he provided great leadership at a time when the church needed it.
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#13 sean.thomas

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 06:08 PM

Hey G2!!  Sorry for getting to this late but it was a great post!!  I have found myself studying alot of the slaves in the Pre-Civil War era lately.  I have read about a bunch of different rascals that were looking for a way to make things better.  Although their goal was similar, how they went about it was different.  Many had different challenges to face and different situations.  The lesson that I learned was that people were willling to die for what they believe in and willing to die to make the changes the world needed for people to live the way we live today.  People became sick and tired and decided to take a stand. 


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#14 JoeTracy

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 03:08 PM

I concur with Mr thomas. Studying both Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman last year really opened my eyes to American history. I have also enjoyed the lessons of peristance from learning more on Thomas Edison this month.

#15 George Guzzardo

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 04:44 PM

To all my brothers and sisters it's time to expand the genre of historical leadership.  Lessons repeat. As Solomon said, "There is nothing new under the son." But why is history being systematically removed from our curriculums? Is there an agenda for those who want to erase our memory of the lessons of the past and those leaders who made a difference? Here is my question for anyone wanting to give feedback. Who are your top five leaders in history and why? 


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#16 Coloneldad

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 05:34 PM

I have recently read the book: "The Real George Washington"  It's amazing just how great his character really was.  No he wasn't perfect but of all people throughout history he is in my opinion one of the greatest ever.  

Additionally "The Real Thomas Jefferson" is also a great book to read to better understand that great man.  He was truly a humble man who even while president was approachable and never took offense at criticism.  The story about him meeting a stranger while out on a horse ride who was criticizing him and never let on as to who he was.  He asked the man if he'd ever met the president and was told he hadn't.  President Jefferson then asked if he'd like to and then invited him to the White House the next day.  Needless to say the man was bit surprised to see Jefferson.  Nothing pretentious about him or the event.  Jefferson won over several 'foes' who once they met him and got to know him became some of his greatest friends.  

Both of these men even after leaving office drove their farms into poverty helping out others and were hard pressed to turn away anyone who came to see them. 


David

 

I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crises. The great point is to bring them them the real facts.

Abraham Lincoln





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